Naaleh College: Online Jewish College

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Naaleh College Course Descriptions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

AP 101 Human Anatomy & Physiology for the Non-Healthcare Provider

The course of Human Anatomy & Physiology will provide clear, current, concise, clinically oriented coverage of the human body. Students will study the body structure by continually developing understanding of the functions of organs and structures in the body. The class will examine the structures, or morphology, of the body parts--their forms and organization. The curriculum will cover the functions of body parts, what they do and how they do it.

 

BIBL 201 Advanced Genesis: Intensive Analysis

The course covers the entire text of the Book of Genesis (Creation, Man in the Garden, Genealogy of Mankind, Tower of Babel, Ten Trials of Avraham, Covenant, Sodom, Eliezer & Rivka, Laban, Avraham vs Isaac, Jacob’s deception, Leah and Rachel, Laban, Eisav, Shechem, Yosef and the brothers, Yosef in Egypt, Persecution of brothers, Jacob’s blessing) with a range of well-known Midrashim, sections from the Talmud, medieval and modern commentaries. By the course end, students should be able to deal with a variety of issues in a relatively mature and sophisticated manner.

 

BIBL 210 Yechezkel

Students study the first half of the book of Yechezkel, Ezekiel. The instructor explains the pshat, or basic meaning of the text, utilizing classical commentaries such as Rashi. Additionally, the instructor delves into the deeper meaning and messages of the text, applying its messages to life.

 

BIBL 211 Survey of Early Prophets

Students study the first four books of the Prophets, known as the Early Prophets: Yehoshua, Shoftim, Shmuel, and M’lachim. They will attain basic familiarity with the history, personalities, and issues that are found throughout these books. Students will study particular themes in greater depth, learning the insights of the classical commentators such as Rashi, Ramban, Ibn Ezra, Malbim and others regarding various topics found in these books. At times, students will compare and contrast the approaches of various commentators, and find connecting themes throughout the commentary of a particular scholar. Students will research topics in depth and analyze selected sections of Neviim Rishonim.

 

BIBL 221 The Books of Daniel and Trei Asar

The book of Daniel is a unique part of the Written Torah. It is mainly written in Aramaic and describes the fascinating and inspirational life of the prophet Daniel. Students will study Daniel, focusing on timeless messages, many of which relate to the Exile and its eventual end. In the second part of the course, the instructor explores Trei Asar, the shorter prophesies of the late Era of Prophecy. These prophecies speak of pivotal concepts such as sin, retribution, repentance, forgiveness, and redemption.

 

BIBL 222 Megillot

Students study the five megillot: Esther, Shir HaShirim, Kohelet, Eicha, and Ruth. The course focuses on the basic meaning of the text as well as the deeper meaning within it.

BIBL 300 Chumash in Depth I

Students take an in-depth look at Moshe’s famous entreaty to G-d in Parshat Va’etchanan. Students also delve into the symbolism, hidden meanings, and G-dly promises of success and survival in Exile that are contained in Jacob's famous dream of the ladder. This advanced class incorporates a close reading of the text along with a practical application of lessons learned.

 

BIBL 311 Yirmiyahu I: Reluctant Prophet

Students study the themes inherent in the first half of the Book of Yirmiyahu. The course focuses on both the structure and beauty of the text, the historical background to the prophecies studied, as well as on the inspiration and spiritual impact that the timeless words of Yirmiyahu have on our lives today.

 

BIBL 421 Tehillim I

Students analyze selected chapters in the book of Tehillim (Psalms). A superficial reading of the text will not reveal the uniqueness of each chapter of Psalms, as praise and pleading seemingly repeat themselves again and again.

Through the use of many commentaries, the instructor breaks down every chapter into its components and clarifies the distinctions between them. What emerges is a new understanding and appreciation of the precision and pathos contained in Tehillim.

 

BIBL-P 101 Parsha Journeys

Parsha Journeys presents the complete storyline of the first two chapters of each of the weekly parshiyot (Torah portions), in addition to insights into some of the more famous events discussed.

 

BIBL-P 201 Biblical Topics I: Breishit, Shmot, and Vayikra

This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in the weekly Torah portion, or Parsha, with a focus on character development. The classes cover most of the parshiot from Genesis, Exodus, and Numbers. Each lecture begins with basic primary sources, usually a verse from the Torah, and then studies extensive selections from both the Early Commentators of the Middle Ages and the Later Commentators of the Modern Era. The instructor adds excerpts from classical works produced by the Chassidic and Mussar Movements, and ties together all components of the lecture to present a new insight into one’s life as an inspired Torah Jew.

 

BIBL-P 310 Chassidut on the Parsha I: Shem Mishmuel

This course is centered on the weekly Torah portion. Within each Torah portion, one or two topics are analyzed and discussed based on the book of Chassidic discourses, Shem MiShmuel, authored between the years 1910-1926, by Rabbi Shmuel Bornsztain, the second Sochatchover Rebbe, who wrote his book between the years 1910-1926. This course attempts to deepen the student’s understanding of some of the themes presented in the books of Genesis and Exodus. This goal is achieved by discussing the narratives presented in this book, and synthesizing them with the comments of the Midrash, the Talmud, and Hasidic thought. The concepts presented are then connected to contemporary life, and the students are able to apply the lessons of the Bible to modern issues and challenges.

 

COM 101 Composition I

This course is designed to help students gain mastery over English grammar and writing skills. By the end of this course, students should feel comfortable writing documents from a simple e-mail to a research paper.

 

COM 102 Composition II

This course is designed to help students gain mastery over technical, descriptive and persuasive writing. Included are techniques for gaining information through critical thinking and analysis of written word. By the end of this course, students should feel comfortable writing more in-depth documents with the ability to influence the reader.

 

CPT 101 Computer Applications

Computer Applications is designed to familiarize students with computers and their applications. Students will learn fundamental concepts of computer hardware and software. Emphasis will be placed on computer applications, in particular word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), as well as basic understanding of databases, and multimedia presentations (Microsoft PowerPoint).

 

CPT 111 Programming in Java Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, recommended CPT 210

This course provides the beginning programmer with a guide to developing applications using the Java programming language. Java is popular among professional programmers because it can be used to build visually interesting graphical user interface (GUI) and Web-based applications. Java also provides an excellent environment for the beginning programming. A student can quickly build useful programs while learning the basics of structured and object-oriented programming techniques.

 

CPT 121 Web Development I Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102

This course focuses on building core competencies in web design and development. The course has two components: HTML and JavaScript The course covers basic to advanced concepts and skills for developing web pages and websites using the most current versions of HTML (HTML5) and CSS (CSS3). Students learn to create dynamic websites that incorporate forms and videos, using JavaScript and CSS (CSS3). Students are exposed to Dynamic CSS as well. The second half of the course covers the fundamentals of JavaScript language, object-oriented JavaScript as well as AJAX.

 

CPT 202 Operating Systems Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, recommended – one semester of any programming language

This course teaches the theory and technical information students will need in order to work with today's popular operating systems, such as Windows, Mac OS, and UNIX/Linux platforms. Topics include operating system theory, installation, upgrading, configuring (operating system and hardware), file systems, security, hardware options, and storage, as well as resource sharing, network connectivity, maintenance, and troubleshooting.

 

 

CPT 210 Database Management Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, MAT 102
This course will give students a solid foundation in database design and implementation. It provides in-depth coverage of database design, demonstrating that the key to successful database implementation is in proper design of databases to fit within a larger strategic view of the data environment. Topics covered include: How C++/Java is used to develop Web-based database applications, as well as relational data model, SQL and manipulating relational data; applications programming for relational databases; physical characteristics of databases; achieving performance and reliability with database systems; object-oriented and distributed information systems

 

CPT 212 C# Programming with Visual Studio.Net Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, CPT 121

This course uses C# as the programming language for software development; however, the basic programming concepts presented can be applied to a number of other languages. Instead of focusing on the syntax of the C# language, this course uses the C# language to present general programming concepts. Once you develop a thorough understanding of one programming language, you can effectively apply those concepts to other programming languages.

CPT 222: Web Development II Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, CPT 210, MAT 102

This course focuses on the Server-Side Web Development and concentrates primarily on the use of PHP/MySQL. The course is divided into various topics: PHP, MySQL, Object oriented PHP, PHP MVC, Secure Web applications. Students will work with these technologies and apply them to real word scenarios.

 

CPT 230 Mobile Application Development Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 210, MAT 102, one semester of any programming language

Students study the design and development principles for mobile iOS applications using the Swift language. The course also provides general knowledge of mobile hardware; cell networks; mobile architectures, operating systems, languages, development environments and simulators, and user interfaces; location-based services; data storage and retrieval.

 

CPT 240 Programming in C++ Pre-Requisites:  CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, CPT 121

An Introduction to Programming with C++, the course is distinct in its unique approach, which motivates students by demonstrating why they need to learn the concepts and skills presented. The program presents a balanced approach to program development and ANSI C. Pointers are introduced gradually. Students will gain knowledge in Top-Down Design with Functions, Selection Structures, Repetition and Loop Statements, as well as Multiprocessing Using Processes and Threads.

 

CPT 301 Information Security Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 303 (pre- or co-requisite), recommended – CPT 210, one semester of any programming language

This course explores the field of information security and assurance, including new innovations in technology and methodologies. The course provides comprehensive coverage of the topic that includes a historical overview of information security, discussions on risk management and security technology, current certification information, and more. Particular focus and emphasis will be given to network security capabilities and mechanisms (Access Control on wire-line and wireless networks), IPsec, Firewalls, Deep Packet Inspection and Transport security. The final portion of the course will address Network Application security (Email, Ad-hoc, XML/SAML and Services Oriented Architecture security).

CPT 311 Fundamentals of Networking Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 301 (pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, CPT 202 (pre-or co-requisite)

This course is designed to provide a solid foundation in essential networking concepts and methods. This detailed introduction, requiring no previous networking experience, covers all of the critical knowledge and skills information technology professionals need to work with network operating systems in a network administration environment. Topics include discussion of fundamental aspects of Internet applications layer (HTTP, FTP, DNS), TCP, UDP socket programming, reliable data transfer, congestion control, network layer (Ipv4 and Ipv6) and routing, link layer and Local Area Networks (LAN), multimedia networking (RTSP, RTP, RSVP, DiffServ), and security in computer networks.

 

CPT 312 Information Technology Management Pre-requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, recommended – CPT 301
This course provides an overview of contemporary I.T. management. It explains the relevant issues of effectively managing information services. The course highlights areas of greatest current and potential application of I.T. to business needs and reviews electronic business, enterprise business systems, and decision support systems.

 

CPT 401: Big Data  Prerequisites: CPT 101, MAT 102, MAT 202, CPT 111 OR CPT 205, CPT 203; Recommended: CPT 307, CPT 400

The field of computer science is experiencing a transition from computation-intensive to data-intensive problems, where data is produced in massive amounts by large sensor networks, new data acquisition techniques, simulations, and social networks. Efficiently extracting, interpreting, and learning from very large datasets requires a new generation of scalable algorithms as well as new data management technologies.

Data Science and Big Data Analytics is about harnessing the power of data for new insights. This course covers the breadth of activities and methods and tools that Data Scientists use. The content focuses on concepts, principles and practical applications that are applicable to any industry and technology environment, and the learning is supported and explained with examples that students can replicate using open-source software.

CPT 412 Cloud Computing Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, CPT 210, CPT 222, CPT 230, CPT 301, CPT 311, CPT 450, CPT 460, MAT 102, MAT 201, MAT 202, one semester of any object-oriented programming language

This course delivers a comprehensive study of Cloud concepts and capabilities throughout the different Cloud service models: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and Business Process as a Service (BPaaS). Current Cloud vendors such as, Google App Engine, Microsoft Azure, Eucalyptus, and OpenStack will be discussed in depth.

 

CPT 450 Systems Analysis and Design I Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, CPT 210, CPT 250, CPT 301, CPT 202, two semesters of any programming language (at least one Object-Oriented language), MAT 102, MAT 202, Recommended- CPT 311

Part I of a two-part course, this course presents the latest systems development methods, tools, and techniques. This segment of the year-long course concentrates on the fundamentals of systems design, analysis of information requirements, and the analysis process.

 

CPT 460 Software Architecture: Design, Implementation, and Testing Pre-Requisites: CPT 101,CPT 121, CPT 210, CPT 212, CPT 301, CPT 202, CPT 450, two semesters of any programming language (at least one Object-Oriented language), MAT 102, MAT 201, MAT 202, Recommended- CPT 230, CPT 311

This course introduces the concepts and best practices of software architecture-how a software system is structured and how that system's elements are meant to interact. Distinct from the details of implementation, algorithm, and data representation, an architecture holds the key to achieving system quality, is a reusable asset that can be applied to subsequent systems, and is crucial to a software organization's business strategy. The course is structured around the concept of architecture influence cycles. Each cycle shows how architecture influences, and is influenced by, a particular context in which architecture plays a critical role. Contexts include technical relations, the life cycle of a project, an organization's business profile, and the architect's professional practices.

 

HEB 101 Elementary Modern Hebrew

The course covers basic conversational skills, displaying comprehension of high-frequency commands, courtesy formulae and simple statements and questions, demonstrating an ability to formulate basic responses to them, and answering questions in Hebrew based on elementary-level listening comprehension passages. Students will also study simple reading passages, and learn how to extract meaning from a string of connected sentences when context or background knowledge are supportive. We will read texts, both silently and aloud, study the Hebrew consonant and vowel systems, learn how to analyze Hebrew words as to their roots, prefixes and suffixes, identify parts of speech, learn the basic rules of Hebrew pronunciation, learn to recognize basic grammatical structures when vocabulary is known or supplied, and identify basic words for foods, articles and places.

 

HEB 201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew Pre-requisites: HEB 101

The course continues to expand the students’ knowledge and understanding of written and spoken Hebrew, including comprehension of complex sentences, the ability to converse for longer periods of time regarding a variety of topics; work out the meaning of longer utterances; and answer aural questions in Hebrew after listening to an intermediate level Hebrew story. Students will learn how to consistently identify the Who, What, When and Where in short connected texts on basic subjects; work out the meaning of longer passages using textual cues, identify most past, present, and future tense forms of frequent verbs in all Hebrew verb patterns, thereby grasping the chronological sequence of events, meet practical and social writing needs on topics related to the writer’s immediate environment, such as biographical details, school and work, take brief notes on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions, write in somewhat descriptive paragraphs, demonstrating full control of simple sentences and use of more complex sentences linked by conjunctions, and translate an intermediate level Hebrew text into English, translate an intermediate level English text into Hebrew.

 

JCAL 101 Jewish Calendar: Chanuka and Purim

In this course, students explore a selection of interpretations surrounding the festivals of Purim and Chanukah. Students examine the esoteric meaning of these days by studying such works as the Sefas Emes, Bnai Yissoschor, and Shem Mishmuel. Students also look at the historical, legal, and ethical aspects of these festivals.

 

JCAL 201 Jewish Calendar: Days of Awe

The Days of Awe, beginning with the month of Elul and concluding with Sukkot, are days of repentance, introspection, self-definition, prayer, and ultimate joy. This course takes a comprehensive look at this emotionally charged period, particularly focusing on the Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur prayers, explaining their structure, the logical sequence of the prayers, and the meaning and symbolism of key tefillot (prayers). Students also examine Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik's important work on Jewish Thought, Al HaTeshuva, which discusses repentance and self-improvement as a means to growth and ascension in service of Hashem.

 

JCAL 202 Jewish Calendar: Remembering the Destruction

Jerusalem was once a city that shone with the Divine Presence and rang with the sounds of people serving their Creator. Today, the Temple no longer stands, and our primary goal of sanctifying the name of Hashem seems to be muted. What were the causes of this destruction? What should we do to return to our former glory as G-d's Holy people, serving Him in Jerusalem? How can we deepen our appreciation of Jewish unity in order to rectify the sin of disunity that caused the destruction? This thought-provoking course explores these questions, and other topics relating to the Three Weeks, The Ninth of Av, and the Tenth of Tevet which commemorate the destruction of the Temple.

 

JLAW 101 Chafetz Chayim: The Laws of Proper Speech

The Laws of Proper Speech, as codified in the book, Chafetz Chaim, are the foundation of many of the laws governing human interaction. Every class begins with a textual analysis, and then proceeds on to a discussion of real-life examples and ways to apply the principles discussed to daily living. The ultimate goal of the course is to encourage self-awareness and self-improvement in the areas of mitzvot bein adam l'chavero (human relations).

 

JLAW 301 Hilchot Shabbat I: Honoring and Violating Shabbat

This course contains an in-depth study of the Laws of Honoring Shabbat and the Laws of Prohibited Activity on Shabbat. Using Biblical verses as a starting point, students follow the halachic discussion in the Talmud, and then go on to the halachic rulings of the Medieval and Contemporary commentaries, ending with the final Halacha as it applies today. Main topics covered are candle lighting, Lechem Mishneh, eating three meals on Shabbat, Kiddush, and Havdalah, the nature and differentiation of Avot Melacha (primary prohibited activities) and Toldot Melacha (subsidiaries of the Avot Melacha), the prohibition of Gozez (cutting) and Borer (sorting) on Shabbat, and the complex halachot (laws) of unintentional melachot and Psik Reisha.

JLAW 331 Jewish Law I: Laws of Daily Living

Study of Halacha, Jewish law: Students will study a halachic text such as Shulchan Aruch and a commentary on it, such as Mishneh Berurah or Aruch Hashulchan. Students will study the first section of Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim.

 

JLAW 332 Jewish Law II: Laws of the Festivals

Study of Halacha, Jewish law: Students will study a halachic text such as Shulchan Aruch and a commentary on it, such as Mishneh Berurah or Aruch Hashulchan. Students will study the third section of Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim.

 

JLAW 400 Hilchot Shabbat II: Bishul

This course contains an in-depth study of various melachot, or prohibited activities on Shabbat. Using Biblical verses as a starting point, students follow the halachic discussion in the Talmud, and then go on to the halachic rulings of the Medieval and Contemporary commentaries, ending with the final halacha as it applies today. Main topics covered are cooking and reheating food on Shabbat.

 

JPHL 101 Fundamentals of Jewish Thought

This course explores four fundamental aspects of Jewish philosophy and faith. Part I examines Maimonides’ Thirteen Principles of Faith as well as the philosophical discussions of the Maharal on faith. Part II analyzes the concept of trust in G-d as the ultimate provider of all of Man’s needs and desires in this world and the Next World. It explains how to focus on joy as the key to developing a trustful relationship with Hashem, and ways to properly face the challenging areas of life that require trust in G-d. Part III examines the role of the Torah as the source for directing the Jewish nation in their unique task in this world and defines the path towards the ultimate redemption. Part IV concludes with an in-depth analysis of the Ten Commandments and the meaning in mitzvot.

 

JPHL 200: Introduction to the Oral Law

This course presents an overview of the structure and content of the Oral Law. The course focuses on Maimonides monumental works on this subject. The course compares Maimonides understanding with other commentaries views regarding the subject. Topics include the history of the Oral Law, identifying important authorities and works, and the development of law through the ages..

 

JPHL 201 Writing of Maharal: Netivot Olam and Netzach Yisrael

Students focus on the books Netivot Olam and Netzach Yisrael, by Rabbi Yehuda Loewe, the Maharal of Prague, a seventeenth century rabbi who authored many books of Jewish philosophy. Students will examine the nature of the yetzer hara, the evil inclination. Students will analyze where its power stems from and how to combat it.

Students focus on the causes of suffering, and how people can grow from suffering. Additionally, students will examine the nature of discord, and define as well as analyze the inherent qualities of peace. Students will focus on the causes for the destruction of the First and Second Temples, and the changes in perspective and behavior that must occur in order to rectify this damage.

 

JPHL 220 Character Development: Selections from Tomer Devora, Chovot Halevavot, and Mesilat Yesharim

This course studies selections from the classical ethical works, Chovot HaLevavot by Rabbenu Bachya ibn Pekuda, Tomer Devora by Rabbi Moshe Cordevoro, and Mesilat Yesharim by Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato. Chovot HaLevavot discusses Man’s purpose in the world and his obligations to G-d in belief, behavior and character. Tomer Devora describes how Man should adapt and adopt G-d’s Thirteen Attributes of Mercy, transforming himself from a mere human to a G-dly individual. Mesilat Yesharim follows a step by step plan of ascension to spiritual perfection, based on a Gemara which lists 15 steps to reach Ruach Hakodesh, Divine inspiration. The instructor explicates these fundamental works and looks at key themes found throughout the books and ways in which they can be applied to daily living.

 

JS201 Judaic Studies Competency Based Project - Elementary

In this project based course, students will work one on one with the instructor to create a project aligned with degree outcomes and the student’s personal interest in Judaism. The content will be basic in nature and will not require advanced Biblical textual skills and extensive knowledge of Biblical Hebrew. Students enrolled in the Judaic Studies concentration will research topics such as Jewish Law, Biblical themes, and Biblical commentaries. Student enrolled in the Talmud concentration will research topics such as the connection between Talmud and Jewish Law, translation of Talmudic Aramaic, and Talmud commentaries. The difficulty and length of time to complete the project will determine the number of credits the student may earn.

 

JS 301 Judaic Studies Competency Based Project – Advanced

In this project based course, students will work one on one with the instructor to create a project aligned with degree outcomes and the student’s personal interest in Judaism. The content will be advanced in nature and will require advanced Biblical textual skills and extensive knowledge of Biblical Hebrew. Students enrolled in the Judaic Studies concentration will research topics such as Jewish Law, Biblical themes, and Biblical commentaries. Student enrolled in the Talmud concentration will research topics such as the connection between Talmud and Jewish Law, translation of Talmudic Aramaic, and Talmud commentaries. The difficulty and length of time to complete the project will determine the number of credits the student may earn.

 

MAT 101 College Mathematics

College Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space, change. Through the use of abstraction and logical reasoning, the class will take students from whole numbers, calculation, and measurement, to the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects.

 

MAT 102 Algebra

The study of algebra will assist students in the rules for manipulating formulae and algebraic expressions involving unknowns and real or complex numbers. The course facilitates the study of properties and patterns that seemingly are a different form of mathematical concepts. Students will gain a thorough grounding in the concepts central to their success in mathematics by successfully connecting from concept to concept

MAT 201 Calculus Pre-requisite: MAT 102

During this course, students will learn that calculus is the study of how things change. It will provide a framework for modeling systems in which there is change, and a way to deduce the predictions of such models. The course will focus on limits, functions, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series.

MAT 202 Statistics Pre-requisite: MAT 102

This course is designed to introduce students to Statistics, which is the science of the collection, organization, and interpretation of data. Students will deal with all the aspects of statistics including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiment. The course provides a first exposure to Statistics I that focuses on technological skills to increase statistical literacy, with detailed explanations presented in an easy conversational writing style. The lessons use a step?by?step problem?solving approach that helps students understand complex statistical concepts, while incorporating educational trends that stress student understanding of basic statistical concepts with the help of technological devices.

MAT 210 Finite Math

This course introduces concepts of mathematics that are applied in various disciplines with an emphasis on the use in business settings. This course is designed to provide the non-mathematics major an intense foundational introduction to fundamental concepts in Mathematics. The course concentrates on pertinent and concrete examples and applications.

NUT 101 Nutrition

This is a nutrition course based in the fundamentals of chemistry. The course provides an overview of nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, water, minerals, vitamins), their importance in nutrition, the fundamentals of metabolism and physiology and an overview of the sources in foods. The course enables students to understand topics in nutrition

 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

The introductory course to psychology will provide students in the applied and academic field studies of the human mind and behavior. Students will seek to understand and explain thought, emotion and behavior. The course will provide a broad view of psychology as well as applications of knowledge gained from contemporary research to problems and challenges students face in today’s world.

 

PSY 201 Introduction to Counseling Pre-requisites: PSY 101

This course will give students an overview of the field of counseling psychology, its history, theories and methods. Students will also be introduced to the ethical and legal challenges of this profession as it is practiced in a multicultural society. In addition students will become acquainted with the many applications and settings in which counseling takes place.

 

SOC 102 Law and Ethics I

The Jewish Bible, or Torah, is one of the oldest and most widely read texts of law, ethics and philosophy. Many of the principles presented in the Torah form the basis of Western ethics, both business and personal.

This course presents issues of integrity in business based on practical examples of Jewish law for a moral and upright society. The course presents modern issues in business ethics with examples of contemporary Rabbinic court cases for thought-provoking and engaging discussions. Classes use case studies and various sources to help students understand the underlying principles and thought processes behind business law. The course is designed to offer current topics to encourage lively interaction and debate. From copyright issues, the fine line between profit-making and overcharging, to keeping ones word and accidentally taking someone’s umbrella, content has been selected to assist students in developing solid ethical and legal decisions.

 

SOC 103 Law and Ethics II

The portions of the Torah which address proper business interactions and respect for others’ property and rights form the body of knowledge known as Business Halacha, or Jewish Monetary Law. A study of these laws and their logical underpinnings will enable students to develop a moral compass and ethical behavior.

This course presents issues of responsibility in business based on practical examples of Jewish law for a moral and upright society. The course presents modern issues in business ethics with examples of contemporary Rabbinic court cases for thought-provoking and engaging discussions. Classes use case studies and various sources to help students understand the underlying principles and thought processes behind Jewish business law. The course is designed to offer current topics to encourage lively interaction and debate. From employer-employee relations, rented, borrowed, or lost property, to business partnerships and responsibilities of a professional to his client, content has been selected to assist students in developing solid ethical and legal decisions.

 

TALM 110 Introductory Talmud Intensive

In-depth study of Talmud at the introductory level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud line by line in the original Aramaic and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. Rashi and Tosfot explain the Talmudic discussions and the logical background to the conclusions of the Rabbis. Students will then study the comments and additions of the later commentators, from the 1600s until today. Students will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate in depth, and spend 270 hours in this course over the semester, in a combination of structured preparation time in a Beit Midrash setting and lecture.

 

TALM 120 Introductory Talmud Survey

In-depth study of Talmud at the introductory level: Students will analyze the text at the basic level, focusing on its content and themes. Students will cover more pages of Talmud than the intensive Talmud course, but will study an overview of the topics covered, and will spend approximately 180 hours in the Talmud survey over the semester.

 

TALM 210 Beginning Talmud Intensive

In-depth study of Talmud at the introductory level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud line by line in the original Aramaic and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. Rashi and Tosfot explain the Talmudic discussions and the logical background to the conclusions of the Rabbis. Students will then study the comments and additions of the later commentators, from the 1600s until today. Students will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate in depth, and spend 270 hours in this course over the semester, in a combination of structured preparation time in a Beit Midrash setting and lecture. Students study of a different section of the tractate that was begun in previous semester or a different tractate.

 

TALM 220 Beginning Talmud Survey

Study of Talmud at the beginning level: Students will analyze the text at the basic level, focusing on its content and themes. Students study a different section of the tractate that was begun in previous semester or a different tractate.

 

TALM 310 Intermediate Talmud Intensive Pre-requisite: TALM 110 or TALM 210

In-depth study of Talmud at the intermediate level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. They will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate.

 

TALM 320 Intermediate Talmud Survey

In-depth study of Talmud at the intermediate level: Students will analyze the text at the basic level, focusing on its content and themes as well as Rashi and Tosfos. This course will learn the beginning of Berachos.

 

TALM 410 Advanced Talmud Intensive Pre-requisite: TALM 110 or TALM 210, TALM 310

In-depth study of Talmud at the advanced level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. They will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate. Students will study a different section of the tractate that was begun in previous semester or a different tractate.

 


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